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Stephen Pearl Andrews autobiography

 Collection
Identifier: SC-Cent. Misc. Mss. 493

Scope and Contents

Typed transcript of Stephen Pearl Andrews’s autobiography covering his life from the 1810s until 1835. The autobiography includes details about his family members and childhood in Templeton (Massachusetts) and Hinsdale (New Hampshire). In 1830, he moved to Jackson (Louisiana) where he describes working at the Jackson Female Seminary, an institution founded by his brother and sister-in- law. During the fall of 1831, Andrews worked as a tutor of Latin at the College of Louisiana (Jackson,La.); pages 157-160 describe student life and members of the faculty. In late 1831, he moved to Clinton (Louisiana) where he assisted his brother’s law practice. The autobiography also contains details about Andrews’s abolitionist and anti-slavery views.

Dates

  • circa 1862

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

Collection is open for research use.

Conditions Governing Use

Physical rights are retained by the Centenary College of Louisiana Archives and Special Collections. Copyright is retained in accordance with U.S. copyright laws.

Biographical / Historical

Stephen Pearl Andrews (1812-1886), was an educator, attorney, abolitionist, linguist, political philosopher, and author. The son of Elisha Andrews and Wealthy Ann Lathrop Andrews, he was born in Templeton, Massachusetts. From 1828 to 1829, he attended Amherst Academy (Amherst, Mass.). In 1830, he moved to Jackson, Louisiana, and taught at the Jackson Female Seminary, an institution founded by his brother and sister-in-law. During the fall of 1831, he was a tutor of Latin at the College of Louisiana (Jackson, La.). Later in 1831, he moved to Clinton, Louisiana, where he assisted his brother’s law practice. He was admitted to practice law in 1833 and continued work with his brother in Clinton. In 1835, he married Mary Ann Gordon (d. 1855) and moved to New Orleans, Louisiana, where he opened his own law practice. In 1839, he moved to the Republic of Texas and practiced law in Houston. After advocating for the abolition of slavery, he was forced to leave Texas in 1843. After travelling to England to raise funds for the abolitionist movement in the United States, he settled in Boston, Massachusetts, and began promoting the Pitman shorthand writing system. In 1848, Andrews moved to New York City, where he became involved with anarchism and developing utopian communities. In 1856, he married Esther Hussey Bartlett Jones.

Extent

1 Folders

Language of Materials

English

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

This collection was donated by Andrew L. Plauché, Jr on 2011 March 11.

Existence and Location of Originals

Original diary is in the collection of Stephen Pearl Andrews papers, U.S. Mss 19A, Wisconsin Historical Society, Division of Library, Archives, and Museum Collections, Madison, Wisconsin.
Title
Finding Aid to the Stephen Pearl Andrews autobiography
Author
Chris Brown
Date
2020
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin

Repository Details

Part of the Centenary College of Louisiana Archives and Special Collections Repository

Contact:
2911 Centenary Blvd.
Shreveport LA 71104 US
(318) 869-5462